Tag Archives: web

The semantic web for publishers and bloggers

The semantic web is often referred to as the “next phase” of the world wide web. It’s also sometimes referred to — perhaps pretentiously — as “Web 3.0”. Wrapped up in this semantic web is an appearance of artificial intelligence as it involves computers “understanding” content (eg: teaching a machine that “Africa” is a continent […]

Powering your site: Technology choices

Making the wrong technology choice can cripple your online business. It can mean expensive maintenance and development costs down the line. It could mean downtime for your website and make the simple act of publishing an article a trapeze act. You don’t want this. A site’s Content Management System (CMS) is the engine of your […]

New launch: Easy web publishing via Synthasite

Well, well, well. The boys and girls from Incubeta — the PPC marketing company — have been busy. They’ve launched Synthasite. I’m a bit late on this, but hey I was down in Cape Town for the World Association of Papyrus and it kept me busy. Synthasite has already got some good reviews from a […]

Is it a bird, is it a plane, is it a blog?

What is this? Can someone tell me.

'Beware the power of social media'

This popped into my inbox this afternoon. I know Jovan Regasek well and have big respect for the man, ITWeb and the other publications his company puts out. For those of you wondering, ITWeb survived full on through the dot.bomb crash and was one of the few online publications that actually gave rise to various […]

The future of the newspaper

From: “European papers optimistic on future — with web’s help” (Sent to me by M&G Online editor, Riaan Wolmarans.) …but European editors interviewed by the Associated Press appear strikingly optimistic about the future. They see the online media explosion more as an opportunity than as a threat, and express confidence they can provide the content […]

Blogs mark the first 10 years

Interesting article spotted in the Guardian. “After a quiet start they revolutionised the web; now one is born every second. The first entry on Scripting News effectively ushered in the first blog 10 years ago. In the intervening years these online diaries have been touted as the future of media, labelled “pathetic drivel”, and caused […]

The buzz on the SA blogosphere

We’ve added more graphing on amatomu.com’s search results. It tracks activity of search keywords over a 30-day period and then graphs the buzz. These are new graphs we added together with the others launched on overall blogosphere trends and individual blogger profiles on top posts etc… Here are the results of some tests I did… […]

First Tuesday & the Afrigator! :-)

Went to my first, first First Tuesday, this one on Web 2.0 and Social Media. I have been trying to go for a while, but it’s always clashed with something major or I am out of the country at the time. I am glad to hear that they are up and running again and plan […]

Bloggers launch and develop for Amatomu.com

You gotta love the blogging community. Vincent Maher and I were blown away by a new widget developed by Quirk Marketing that we saw advertised on their blog gottaQuirk this morning in a post written by Craig Raw. It’s a browser search plugin for Amatomu.com‘s search that works on IE7 and Firefox. Apparently The Scott […]

Amatomu.com

Yep, the cat certainly has clawed it’s way out of the proverbial bag. It’s been hell keeping this thing a sort of, kind of semi-secret. Not really possible in the blogosphere. Amatomu.com (Alpha) is in public testing phase. Vincent Maher has the full story here. A huge thanks to all the bloggers who have signed […]

Linklove: what big media can learn from bloggers

The fundamental art of linking is something online media could learn from the blogosphere….

Without linking there wouldn’t be an internet. It’s the web of links that leads a user from website-to-website that essentially creates the thing we know as the world wide web. Many commercial online media publishers hate linking from their websites to the “outside”, especially when there’s a competitor involved. It’s a protective, “walled garden” mentality, prevalent in many traditional media businesses, which doesn’t translate particularly well on the wild world wide web. It’s pretty silly, because linking is the whole point of the web.

This where the blogosphere could teach online publishers a thing or two…. read on

Online ads: What’s working?

Online advertising as we know it is crude. But it is entering a new era of sophistication….

The internet allows us to target advertising to an unprecedented degree, so why are most banner ads still served on such a hit-and-miss basis?

Publishers slap up an insurance ad on a homepage in the hope they will get the industry average 0,3% click-through rate or more. If they achieve that click-through rate, everyone is happy. But here is the question — what happened to the other 99,7%? Surely by any standards this is a pretty inefficient ratio? It may be at first glance, but that 0,3% is still valuable enough for advertisers to achieve major return on investment by forking out big bucks to be on the major sites.

The type of client found on local online publishers give us a clue as to what is working on the web. For example, insurance and car companies have had a very successful love affair with the internet. The one thing they have in common is that a single acquisition equals very high value for them, for example someone buying a car or taking out a long-term insurance policy. It’s also why the high-worth online audience, which can afford to pay regular premiums, works for their brand… (read on)

24.com & Yahoo!

I wandered over to Yahoo! for the first time in a long time and was struck by the similarity of the site with our own, home-grown, South African portal 24.com. 24.com is apparently doing very well so far… and hats off to ’em for innovating — they’ve got a good platform to start doing some […]

Editors Weblog on M&G Online

I see the well-read editor’s weblog has published an interview they did with me on the Mail & Guardian Online, here. It’s probably in anticipation for the upcoming World Association of Newspapers conference that will soon be happening in Cape Town. It’s quite a major event — Thabo Mbeki will speak at it I believe. […]

SA Blog awards, now open

The third annual SA blog awards, now open! They’ve got a great website and a cool widget. Enter now!!!

Moneyweb relaunch

One of my favourite websites, Moneyweb, has relaunched, featuring a wide-format design. Their site used to be run by iafrica.com, who lost the contract to do it. I like the wide-format look and the generous use of whitespace… kind of like NY Times and Washingtonpost.com. It’s the direction that most news sites are going. The […]

SA's online newspapers set to grow

Francois Nel from the For the Media blog pointed me towards his blog recently (pretty good, I must say). This post in particular caught my eye. He broadly examines why online newspapers in South Africa are not cracking it, compared to their world counterparts. For Francois — it’s down to leadership: It is, I would […]

Joburg geekerati gathering

Got reports from Vincent Maher at his Emmarentia Lake picnic birthday on Sunday that the new-look geek event in Joburg for “techies, media practitioners, speakers, businesspeople, entrepreneurs” called 27 was a roaring success, so went to check it out on a few local blogs. Vince presented some of the Mail & Guardian Online’s social networking […]

Decline of the homepage

Website consumption patterns are changing. Remember when the main way to surf a website was via its homepage? Well, that was the old days. The rise of super-fast, super-efficient search engines mean that users are increasingly accessing websites via deep links that bypass their homepages directly to a website’s articles. It’s essentially a backdoor into your website. Search engines aren’t the only ones to blame. Bloggers generally link directly to the articles they are writing about, ignoring homepages. RSS feeds, which allow users to subscribe directly to article feeds, are also responsible for the decline of the homepage. So what does this mean? Paradoxically it is both a problem and an opportunity for publishers.