At the World Association of Newspaper’s conference in Cape Town, Anton Harber on journalism.co.za writes that it is “Not all doom and gloom from newspapers”.

Negative perceptions of the future of newspapers were challenged by a barrage of figures by Timothy Balding, CEO of the World Association of Newspapers, where he says:

Newspapers in developing markets continue to increase circulation by leaps and bounds, and in mature markets are showing remarkable resilience against the onslaught of digital media. Even in many developed nations the industry is maintaining or even increasing sales

Here are the figures:

  • Daily, 515-million newspapers are sold across the world by 1,6-billion people.
  • There are now 11 207 titles around the world, the highest in history.
  • Paid newspaper sales were up 2,3% last year, and 4,3% if you include free newspapers
  • Newspaper advertising revenue increased 3.77 percent in 2006 from a year earlier, and was up 15.77 percent over five years.
  • 41% of newspaper titles were tabloid versus the broadsheet format, which is now just 40% of titles.
  • The biggest growth came in free newspapers, particularly in Europe, which were up 46% last year to make up 32% of the European newspaper market.
  • The number of papers with websites went up 80% in the last three years and 16% in 2006.
  • The Japanese remain the world’s greatest newspaper buyers, with 630.9 daily sales per thousand adults. They are followed by Norway with 601.2 sales per thousand, Colombia with 587.8, Finland with 514.7 and Sweden with 466.2.
  • In Africa, sales were up 8.24 percent in South Africa in 2006, and 43.18 percent over five years. Sales were stable in Nigeria and Kenya in 2006 and up 7.89 percent and 1.90 percent respectively over five years.
  • (source: WAN-PRESS)

    (WAN is a Paris-based, global organisation for the newspaper industry, and defends and promotes press freedom world-wide. It represents 18,000 newspapers; its membership includes 76 national newspaper associations, newspaper companies and individual newspaper executives in 102 countries, 12 news agencies and 10 regional and world-wide press groups.)

    3 Responses to “Demise of the newspaper greatly exaggerated”
    1. You think, Uno? Even though I am an online man through and through (never worked on a print product, being a new media graduate that has always been in new media) — it is hard to argue with the figures.

      Even with my pro-online blinkers on, surely the figures speak for themselves? Or is this lies, damn lies and statistics?

    2. it didn’t pick up my sarcasm tags… but they’re there…

    3. Pah, that’s only linkbaiting…

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