Chris Pirillo, founder of Lockergnome, is a philosophical and passionate person. He’s a humble guy and a funny, engaging speaker. He’s someone who loves technology, community and gadgets — and is a great speaker. At Le Web he gave us some original thoughts about “community”. It’s a bit fluffy (and if you’re a cynic, you may say “vacuous”), but if you think about every one of these points below carefully, there’s quite a bit of insight and deeper truth to them. It makes a difference from the many business-oriented slides we see that tend to be literal and practical.

So, what is the essence of community? Community…

  • …lives inside us. Where I go, community goes. We create it based on our preferences, like dislikes and the people we link up with.
  • …is becoming increasingly distributed, as we distribute our ideas and thoughts across social networks.
  • …requires tools that can’t be built (so don’t try), ie if its us, we can’t scale ourselves.
  • …is a commodity, but people aren’t. It’s easy to set up a website or blog, but the people and voices behind it are what makes it unique, special.
  • …cannot be controlled, but can be “guided”.
  • …is no longer defined by physical boundaries. You probably have more in common with a geek living on another continent than your next door neighbour.
  • …grows its own leaders. the best leaders come organically out of a community, and is not an appointed one. It’s crucial that communities grow it’s own leaders for credibility and respect reasons.
  • …is the antithesis of ego. Community is myself and everyone else, not just me or my Twitter stream.
  • … is everywhere, inside you. It’s what you share, your passions — and it’s this that will spell success.
    2 Responses to “Le Web: Chris Pirillo's pillars of community”
    1. […] Chris Pirillo of Lockergnome delivered a stirring, original and passionate presentation on “community” — and YouTube CEO and founder, Chad Hurley, gave the conference some down-to-earth and […]

    2. […] articulated some underlying principles for creating true (virtual) community. Matt Buckland[1] recorded Chris’ points in text form. I’m going to make some comments on them […]

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